A/V Project

This project asks you to produce an A/V text with a clear and substantial sense of purpose. Our A/V Project handout offers a more thorough overview of how we might understand the goals of the assignment and how we might draw on the concepts from Writer/Designer.

Regardless of your purpose, you should produce an audio, video, or image file that can be shared on sites such as Soundcloud, YouTube, or Vimeo and posted to your class site or otherwise submitted electronically. This assignment also has a written component that should be added to your class site. The following notes outline specific approaches your project might take.

Podcast
Audio production offers an opportunity to splice together or layer different audio files and sound sources. A podcast is a type of audio text that aims to tell a story, make an argument, offer an analysis, or otherwise comment on or inform us about a topic. Your podcast could involve audio recordings you make of yourself and/or others, and you are also welcome to draw on audio from other sources: interviews, music, etc. Your podcast should include at least three different audio sources/elements.

If you are looking for audio files to incorporate, I would recommend checking out these sites for public domain or Creative Commons licensed materials: the Free Music ArchiveMusopenAmerican RhetoricLOC Sound Recordings, and the Internet Archive. If there is audio you want to use on YouTube, you can download it.

You might have audio editing and production software on your computer (e.g., GarageBand), and you are welcome to use this. Otherwise, you will need to download software onto your computer or onto a Bonaventure computer. I would recommend Audacity.

Video
Video production and remixing offers an opportunity to splice together or layer different video and audio files and images. For the purposes of our project, your video would need to tell a story, make an argument, offer an analysis, or otherwise comment on or inform us about a topic. Your video could involve recordings you make, and you are also welcome to draw on other sources of video, audio, and image materials. Your video should include at least three different A/V sources/elements.

If you are looking for video files and images to incorporate, I would recommend checking out these sites for public domain or Creative Commons licensed materials: the Public Domain Review, the Internet ArchiveWikimedia Commons, the Library of Congress, and Flickr. Keep in mind that sites like YouTube and Flickr allow you to search for Creative Commons licensed material. On YouTube, you can select a “Creative Commons” filter on your search. On Flickr, you can do this under the advanced search option. If there is video you want to use on YouTube, you can download it or get a screen capture using software like Debut.

You might have video editing and production software on your computer (e.g., iMovie or Final Cut Pro), and you are welcome to use this. Otherwise, you will need to download software onto your computer or onto a Bonaventure computer. I would recommend VideoPad or Vimeo or other free software.

Images
For image production and remixing, we’re looking for ways to compose or repurpose images. Your work could go in a few different directions. You could produce your own images, either of yourself (toward a more radical selfie) or something else; you could create a set of memes by taking existing memes or new images and adding your own words to them using a site like imgflip; you could create a collage by combining a series of images and laying them out in a specific way; you can create a comic strip using a platform like StoryboardThat or Pixton. Regardless of your approach, you would need to have a substantial sense of purpose that goes beyond the experimental nature of the Remix assignment. You would need to aim to tell a story, make an argument, offer an analysis, or otherwise comment on or inform us about a topic.

Reflection
Your work on the project should be organized on your website on a “A/V Project” post or page. If possible, you should embed your work on the page. For example, if you post a video to YouTube, embed the YouTube video on the page; if you create a set of images, include the images on the page. Any work that is not embedded or linked to on this page can be submitted through email or in a class folder on Dropbox.

In addition to the multimedia composition you produce, you should also post a reflection (minimum 500 words) on your class site that addresses your work on the remix. Your reflection should address the following prompts.

  • What was the main purpose of your a/v work? What did you hope to achieve or communicate here? Where were you most successful in achieving this purpose? Least successful? Point to specific aspects of your work and explain how they add to your project.
  • How did you spend your time on the project? What challenges did you encounter? How would you describe the challenge of writing with audio and images? What can you do with these media that you can’t do with words?
  • Comment on your work for this project in relation to the question of fair use. Where did you incorporate the work of others into your project? How would you defend your use of these materials with reference to the principles of fair use?

Your project should also address concerns of accessibility. If your project includes static images, you should have alt-text for these images. If your project includes audio or video recordings, you should have a transcript (see a sample here). Depending on the length of your audio or video, you do not necessarily need to include a complete transcript. If you do not produce a transcript for the entire audio or video, your transcript should be at least a page.

Finally, your should cite and give credit to any sources you draw on. The Purdue OWL can help us cite online sources and other relevant sources such as interviews, pictures, songs, etc. You can do this directly in your project (for example, including credits at the end of a video) or on your website post for the project.