Final Assignment

You have three options for our final assignment: a final presentation, a video, or a podcast. The presentation would likely take less work than the video or podcast, but there would be higher expectations for a presentation since we have more experience with presentations over the semester.

Final Presentation
The presentation should draw on your work in the Ethics Paper. The content of the presentation can draw directly on the paper or build off it in some way. To challenge ourselves, you should use a different presentation software, either Prezi or Canva (if you want to try something else, let me know). The length requirement will depend on how many people want to present and thus how much time we have available, but these presentations will likely be longer than the previous ones.

Video or Podcast
Working with digital video and images and/or audio offers a different approach to our interest in advanced oral communication. Producing videos and podcasts allows us to combine our own recordings and images with outside sources (videos, images, music, other audio sources). These modes of digital production put a heavy emphasis on editing as well, on how we bring these different elements together to form a new text.

Here are some possibilities for this final assignment. The broad time ranges aim to account for the editing demands that come with producing videos and podcasts. A one-minute video can take longer to produce than a six-minute video if it involves more editing – more video and image sources, more audio splicing, more effects, etc.

  • Podcast. Your podcast should be at least two minutes, and I would recommend an upper limit of six minutes. You should include at least three audio sources. The sources will likely include a recording of your own voice and potentially interviews you conduct, background music, and/or other audio files you find online. Your outside sources can be documentaries, news clips, interviews, or anything else that fits with your topic. In terms of content, your work can draw on any of our other assignments this semester. You can directly translate your work on a previous assignment into a podcast or build on this earlier work in some way. There are a number of possibilities here, and I would be happy to discuss them with you further if you have questions.
  • Video. Your video should be at least one minute, and I would recommend an upper limit of six minutes. You should include at least three image/video sources and at least two audio sources. The sources will likely include recordings you make of yourself or others, background music and images, and/or other sources you find online. Your outside sources can be documentaries, news clips, interviews, or anything else that fits with your topic. In terms of content, your work can draw on any of our other assignments this semester. You can directly translate your work on a previous assignment into a podcast or build on this earlier work in some way. There are a number of possibilities here, and I would be happy to discuss them with you further if you have questions.

As noted, the content for your podcast or video can go in a few different directions. Your content can follow along with a previous assignment; you can conduct interviews with members of your community; you can tell a story of your personal experience or another story relevant to your community. Your work can be more formal, professional, and academic, or more informal, personal, and exploratory. Your work can involve any combination of analysis, argument, reflection, and storytelling. In other words, your content can go in a number of directions as long as it fits with our main concerns with our communities.

I will offer further instruction on audio and video production as needed for people interested in this approach to the final assignment. The main programs available on SBU computers are Audacity and VideoPad. You might have other programs like GarageBand or iMovie on your personal computer. Again, I can help you get started, but it will also help to look at online tutorials (such as this video on Audacity).

Final Reflection
Regardless of which approach you take (presentation, podcast, or video), you should submit a final reflection paper (600-900 words) to accompany your work. Your reflection should address the following prompts:

  • What aspects of your final assignment were most effective? Least effective? What did you like most about your work? What are you most proud of?
  • If you gave a presentation, how did this presentation compare to previous ones? If you made a video or podcast, how would you describe the challenges of this work?
  • What are the main things you learned about writing, oral presentations, and digital production (if applicable) this semester? How do these different modes of communication allow you to achieve different things? Which type of composition and communication did you enjoy most?
  • Revisiting our Community Reflection Papers from the beginning of the semester, how has your understanding of your community changed this semester through our various assignments? How has your understanding of your field’s attitudes, values, orientation, and trained incapacities shifted? What have you learned about your community?